Capital Blu Suspended by NFA

The NFA has suspended Capital Blu’s membership. This is the latest twist in the Capital Blu saga. 

See details below:

NFA takes emergency enforcement action against Florida firm, Capital Blu Management LLC

September 17, Chicago – National Futures Association (NFA) announced that it has taken an emergency enforcement action against Capital Blu Management LLC (Capital Blu), a Commodity Trading Advisor located in Melbourne, Florida. Effective immediately, the Member Responsibility Action (MRA) suspends Capital Blu from NFA membership and prohibits Capital Blu from soliciting or accepting any customer or pool participants’ funds or placing trades on behalf of any customers or pools. The MRA also prohibits Capital Blu from disbursing or transferring any funds of customers or pools from any accounts without NFA’s approval and from acting in any manner which requires registration under the Commodity Exchange Act.

NFA issued the MRA to protect Capital Blu’s customers because Capital Blu has refused to fully cooperate with NFA in an examination of the firm and its operations. The investigation was prompted when NFA received allegations from customers of Capital Blu that it had provided false statements to customers and participants in the CBM FX Fund LP and possibly other pools.

The MRA will remain in effect until Capital Blu has demonstrated to the satisfaction of NFA that it is in complete compliance with NFA Requirements. Capital Blu may request a hearing before NFA’s Hearing Committee.

NFA is the premier independent provider of innovative and efficient regulatory programs that safeguard the integrity of the derivatives markets.

source: http://www.nfa.futures.org/news/newsRel.asp?ArticleID=2182

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91 Responses

  1. Well, well.

    Financial crises affecting all.

    Just heard JMMB may have some exposure to Lehman Brother, however it does not appear to be too large

  2. the financial crisis on wall street has nothing to do with these jamaican trading schemes falling apart

  3. Any Capital Blu investors/clients out there, have you received your overnight letter from Capital Blu stating the money has been frozen and requires NFA approval to retrieve it?

    Sirach, oh where oh where are you? What happen to the 10 names a night of the many churches that have invested in Olint?

  4. Mr. Martinez, did the NFA turn their attention toward you this week when the NFA could get no satisfaction from Capital Blu?

  5. DaveSin yu deh bout?

  6. Did it ever occur to you that Sirach is other than who they say they are! From the looks of things it could be the Conman that was just Granted bail in the STAR** think and check.

  7. Robin Irie:

    Yeah Mon. Mi just watching all the Forex geniuses (the crooks) fall one by one.

    Your Feedback:

    That’s not cool! Our Friend Sirach wouldn’t con anyone…maybe shoot them, yes! I’m curious though, how did you make the connection?

  8. Is this another one of the Martinez or its just similar name.

    http://www.nfa.futures.org/basicnet/Case.aspx?entityid=0295431&case=08BCC00002&contrib=NFA.

    AML – tell us more on this one.

  9. Ok, DaveSin I will hold that thought for a few more days.

  10. Jay

    That Martinez is not related to the FL Martinez (the sewer crew).

  11. Thanks AML.

    Just checking .

  12. Dave

    What your view on the comrades come saturday? think they will make the right choice?

  13. Bwoy USA gov to guarantee some money maket funds.Ban short selling.

    Maybe they should do that in Jamaica!!

  14. The US Gov. also borrow a page from Omar Davis and will have a FINSAC to buy bad debt from institutions.
    Deja Vu!

  15. This just shows in the starkest sense that there is no free market economy. The USA once the poster child of capitalism is really ostensibly not so. Banks can rack up huge profits ,pay huge bonuses take risks and then be bailed out with public funds. What a joke.

  16. Seems the much vilified Omar Davis has been vindicated locally and international.Seems this man is a genious despite what those from the bandoloo class has made him out to be.Events of the past six months has given us a reality check.

  17. Well I would not go that far winston. Omar Davis caused the meltdown in the 90s with his high interest rate policy. In fact as had been said before he had the first AIS scheme with T Bills paying 30-50 percent. That spawned JMMB and DB&G. His policies caused the meltdown. The WAY it was dealt with was very costly to a poor JA but good.

  18. Post 911 Greenspan kept interest rates too low for too long. That caused the housing bubble which now burst along with all the mortgage backed securitiies that was packaged and sold to all and sundry. Omar Davis conversely had interest rate too HIGH for too long!!!!!!!!

  19. analysis in hindsight, will make anyone seem like a Genius.
    One must make financial decisions on what data they have at the time.

    and then, let the chips fall where they may

  20. Omar wrecked the middle class. Why cant we see who benefitted from the ‘bail out’? As RSI said earlier, he created the problem and the country is still paying the price for it.

  21. Winston niney:

    You have a full grasp of the issues that took place in the 1990s. Posters like Michael and RSI will continue to perpetrate the nonsense that it was the government’s “high interest rate” regime during that period that caused the collapse of the Jamaican Financial System. In the US, its not low interest rate that cause the problem, it’s the 100 % financing/refinancing and approval of loans to people that under any prudent financial system, should be approved for a loan (fraud?) to begin with.

    In Jamaica, if you look at the vast majority of borrowers who were unable to repay their loan, their basic interest rate was well below 15 %. What most of these borrowers were doing where using their Overdraft facilities (at high interest rate) as a piggy bank and coupled with poor business practices back then that put them in a bind.

    I dare anyone to provide any proof to the contrary. I can provide many “links” to proof my point. Ask Audley Shaw and Edward Seaga, they were major recipients of these unsecured loans and refuse to pay back borrowed funds when their poorly run business could not generate enough income to cover these loans.

  22. Dave sin

    It is not the 100 percent financing that caused the problem in the states. To be true it was multifactorial but the low interest policy post 911 caused major overheating in the economy esp housing. People were speculating, flipping , unscrupulous brokers were doing no doc mortgages to people who could not afford the payments etc.And of course the big one adjustable rate mortgages. That was the pierce de resistance. The low rates spawned all of the above and caused the bubble.

  23. RSI:

    IF we went back to the so call “low rates” TODAY, will we re-create the SAME lending scenario that I say is the root cause? In other words, if we assume that low interest funds are available to the American public today; will they be able to access those funds as they did 2-5 years ago and as such, see a default pattern we are now experiencing?

    I had one guy that did some work for me on a as needed basis was able to purchase three homes in the space of two years and lost all three of them in that period of time. He and his wife did not have a full-time job. If fact, they walked away from the closing table with cash back (125 % financing). The pay the first month mortgage payment on the first property and did not pay anymore. When the house went into foreclosure, they quickly purchase bigger house and did not even make a single payment. The third property technically wasn’t theirs, since their names were only used to secure the mortgage. The rightful owner of course could not make the monthly mortgage payments and hence foreclosure!

    Please answer this basic question? I will then respond!

  24. Michael, on September 19th, 2008 at 2:06 pm Said: ….”
    Omar wrecked the middle class.”….

    If Omar decimate the middle class in Jamaica, where did ALL that money came from to be funneled into ALL these UFOs? Let me guess….MARS!

  25. DaveSin,

    You dont know the struggles that people endured during the Finsac debacle. I have experienced it first hand. You cannot make a business plan with Interest Rates at 18% in Year One and then it shot up to 120% in less than 2 years and expect that business to survive. You cannot compare the bail out in the US by the Feds with Finsac. I believe you are much wiser than that.

    The bail out was in the 90’s. The UFO’s came around in 2003 or later.

  26. Michael:

    Not too wise I suppose. Maybe I’m understanding you now. Are you saying that during the 1990s Omar wrecked the middle class (high interest rate), but during the 2000s they recovered (low interest rate) and were able to amass a small fortune so that they had “money they could afford to lose” and invested these funds in UFOs?

    Read this artcle and give me your take:

    http://www.jamaicaobserver.com/columns/html/20080428t190000-0500_135037_obs_down__but_not_out.asp

  27. Not saying that at all. New money came into the picture during the 2000’s. During the meltdown, some persons benefited from Repos and other instruments. That article is rather distressing. I know of many similar cases. The article is taking it down to the personal level. I was looking at a company like Mutual Life and comparing to LOJ. One was bailed and the other allowed to fold and sold off to ‘foreigners’.

    The debts that were sold off were sold for 15cents (I maybe wrong on this) on the dollar. Now, if I owe money and the govt offered to assist and gave me an option of paying back 50 cents on the dollar, I would so arrange. So the government would get 50 instead of 15. The interest is compounding and the way it seems, you are unable to pay it off regardless. The first pyramid scheme in Jamaica.

    All I am asking is for a inquiry into the whole Finsac debacle. And why cant details be released about who got bailed and who were sunk?

  28. Dave sin

    I think we are living in a different world now. Credit is more difficult to get. Banks are collapsing, housing inventory is up and new and existing home sales are down. Banks are less keen to lend now as they have been burnt badly so to answer your question no. The scenario could not be recreated now with low rates in the current environment. What triggered the bubble bursting is the higher mortgage resets. People could afford the teaser subprime rates but not the resets.So the that sparked the wave of foreclosures that started the whole problem last year. It was not 100 percent financing but low adjustable subprime rates.However the 100 percent financing contributed to it but it was not the root cause.

  29. DaveSin

    That article by Betty Ann Blaine is a keeper. The Mercedes Benz for his wife says it all. We are supposed to feel sympathy for a man who can’t pay his debts but can buy a Merc free and clear? Blaine may be well-meaning but she can’t see the wool being pulled over her eyes.

  30. So if i get you correct rob, assume for a moment that the finsac debacle was as they make it out to be, opressive and cruel, wipping ou tthe entire fledgeling black middle class in ja. your positiotn is, because this man once was able to live a life of relative luxury, we should have no sympathy now that he has found himself wrecked by policies of davis?
    i dont get that logic. its either an injustice was commited against these people or not.
    if it wasnt then we have no argument.
    but, if it was, then the relative wealth of the deprived persons at the start of the melt down has no consequence on the debate..its not relevant.
    a man suffering is a man suffering, regardless of the heights from which he has fallen. we can be so cold in jamaica, so many of us take a political prism to the finsac debate that it makes it impossibel for there to be a discussion on the issue. all you are often able to get are these emotive responses, di man did a live big life, di man dem neva a pay back di money.
    we continure to fail ourselves and fal well below the standard if we approach the issue with that posture.

  31. Jon:

    Did you read the article? If you did, you would have notice that the basic interest rate quoted for the two loans were 9 and 12 per cent. What kill this guy and others like him was the interest rate on the overdraft facility. In other words, a lot of people during the 1990s was using this method of “short term financing” as their modern credit card. Racking up debt without any forethought as to how they were going to repay it. The banks on the other hand used this as an off balance sheet events for years and as such, the massive amount of overdraft “loans” were not showing up on their books…until Omar stepped in and say, wait this overdraft amounts exceeded even the legitimate loan amounts by factors of 3 or more. When these banks were forced to show their real loan outstanding, it was then clear that their banks were insolvent or undercapitalized. Its interesting that the guy in question was making the payment on the regular loans, yet he was racking-up huge amounts in overdraft. How was this allow to happen…oh, Omar said he could do it 🙂

    Bottom line, to blame high interest rate regime on the collapse of the financial system in Jamaica is naive. The problem was poor lending practice and outright incompetence. If it was a simple “high interest” policy, WHY wasn’t BNS affected?

    WHY wasn’t a lot of OTHER individuals affected? They got unsecured loans from their buddies at these banks and had no assets at risk when their loans went into default.

    Here is another story. Maybe you can tell me why this guy got FINSACED…..nothing to do with high interest rate!

    http://www.jamaicaobserver.com/columns/html/20080421t210000-0500_134794_obs_finsac_s_ruined_lives.asp

    Like Bob, I do not feel sorry for any of them. BTW, there are many people that had loans during this time period, had good business practices and generate adequate income to meet their loan obligations and survived the melt down.

    A little know fact…Jamaican Banks had THE highest spread between interest rate paid to depositors and interest rate charge on loans, during the 1990s (throughout the Caribbean region). In other words, the banks themselves were extorting their own clients!

  32. The NFA wants to know more info on other Capital Blu funds.

    Notice I-08-24

    September 19, 2008

    Request for Information

    Please contact NFA Manager Heather Johnson at (312) 781-1554 (hjohnson@nfa.futures.org) or NFA Supervisor Melissa Glasbrenner at (312) 781 -1509 (mglasbrenner@nfa.futures.org) immediately if you ever transacted business with, currently carry or have carried any futures, forex or other accounts in the name of, or controlled by, any of the following entities:

    Blu Fund FX
    Blue Fund FX
    Blu FX Options Benchmark
    Blue FX Options Benchmark
    CBM FX Fund Ltd
    CBM FX Master Fund Ltd
    FX Blu
    FX Blue
    FX Blu Management LLC
    FX Blue Management LLC

    The depth of fraud continues.

  33. A lot of you here were on a frollick castigating Dr Davis and the FSC when they tried to protect Jcans from themselves,the FS Theif and others .Now that it is patently clear that the man was correct we are talking about the things that were done to protect the economy of Ja. as been negative and not making the same point in respect of the bastion of capitalism who has taken pretty much the same set of actions…How come?

  34. Portia Again LOL!!

  35. Mia

    What was the voter split?

  36. I dont remember the exact fig but

    It was 4000 votes in total 2300 plus for portia and 1900 plus for Peter. I wonder what Peter will do now and those supporters of his?

  37. Peter is serious trouble now as he no longer has an executive position!!

  38. Team Portia Wins PNP Presidential Election Race
    http://www.go-jamaica.com/news/read_article.php?id=3831

    “The matter is now settled with Portia Simpson Miller winning by 2332 votes from a total of 4291 to continue her Presidency. While Arise and Renew recieved some 1959 votes. “

  39. God help the PNP with the virago Portia at the helm!

  40. I take her over bruce any day

  41. funny obama gets the same treatment from white people in america lol!!

  42. RSI:

    No…God help us ALL!! A wrecked PNP and a weak JLP……A Jamaica in CRISIS.

    The PNP has been overrun by neophytes and do-nothing types. How long can be tolerate an imbecile at the helm of the PNP? Apparently ………into perpetuity.

  43. Don’t worry. Be happy.

  44. jon

    You missed the point. Talking about injustice is a smokescreen. The man bought a farm and got into trouble with it. No problem there. Business is business and I, for one, don’t condemn a man for trying and failing. But while this man was “struggling” to repay loans at concessional interest rates he was meanwhile able to buy a mercedes benz free and clear. This kind of behaviour was so routine amongst those who were able to borrow that even now there are people who see nothing wrong with it (like Blaine). It is almost as if the borrowers were entitled.

    Then, when the dolly house mash up, it’s time for the banks and the depositors to suck it up. When they couldn’t take it, it was government’s (ie taxpayers and creditors) turn to suck it up.

  45. miachica

    You can not compare Portia to Obama!!!

  46. If only you understood. The point is not missed at all. I agree with Jon. You all work to enjoy the finer things in life. When one starts a business, unless its the Salvation Army or United Way, you go into it to make profits. It doesnt matter what he wants to do with the profits. Just because his business went into problems, you immediately believe that he squandered the money. If he has problems paying back a loan of 7 million, compounding interest and penalties to take it to 100 million will make it easier to pay back? Dont be ridiculous.

    Interest rates moved from concessionary of 12% to 60%. Overdraft interest rates moved to 120%. Again, I asked which business can survive? When clients not making money, how will banks make money?

  47. Michael:

    Help me understand something. Back in the 1990s (or even now), when you apply/sign for loan, isn’t the interest rate FIXED for the period of the loan? Are you saying that the majority or a large number of these loans were variable rate loans? If so, how often or at what frequency were these loans reset? Monthly? Semi-annually? Annually?

    Also, if indeed it was variable, wasn’t there a “cap” rate; the maximum the rate can ever get? If yes, does these maximum rates factored into the equation when making a decision to secure the loan? Pardon by ignorance on the subject, since what all that I have read, people took these loans fully cognizant of what the carrying cost was before signing on the dotted line.

  48. You can’t have it both ways. Was the man making profits or was he losing money? If he was making profits, by all means he should enjoy it. But his tale of woe to the bank was that he was not making enough money to service the loan (even when the rates were low). My incredulity is that he can moan about losing a new mercedes benz he bought free and clear while he claims to have been unable to service his loan.

    Actually, the incredulity is not at his doublethink but that bystanders have bought it and continue to do so as everybody is blamed except the borrower.

  49. Dave Sin

    Most lending rates in Jamaica are essentially variable but have traditionally been sticky both ways (they have lagged increases in inflation and they have lagged reductions as well). What blew everybody’s mind in the 1990s was that inflation kept on rising and interest rates along with them. Normally, borrowers did well out of the dynamic as inflation rose and people borrowed more and more heavily to play the traditional one-way bet on the currency. The government fought back, the usual histrionics and gesticulations and then eventually the dollar would be devalued and a new equilibrium reached for another few years. What was unusual in this period was the performance of the exchange rate and the dynamic set up by a heavily over-valued exchange rate coupled with exchange liberalisation while the gasolene tap was still open. The gasolene was liquidity which was being pumped out with abandon as the government ran up its overdraft at the central bank to cover its fiscal deficits.

    Something had to give.

  50. people who got Finsac, had themselves to talk a lot of the blame.. Just like people who borrow on their credit card to put in investment schemes…

    it seems like a good idea.. get a credit card advance of 30 % and invest in a scheme that pays 120 %.

    If the scheme fails, we cannot then blame the credit card company for high interest rates and putting on penalties for non payment.

    A lot of the Finsac investors had failing business, which results in a change in the terms of their financing, since they were no longer servicing their loans.

    Pretty much, and lender will change the terms on you ( demand all payments) if you are not servicing your loan in a reasonable manner

  51. Capitalism and its attendant greed seems to be taking a beating,a lot of the problems we are facing now locally and internationally is grounded in some systemic problems associated with some of the arrangements that governs our world finacial,social and political systems.Ian Boyne,John Maxwell and Garnet Ropers articles in yesterdays newspapers are must read…….

  52. Capitalism is still superior to anything else. It just needs to be regulated. Any system without restraint will lead to chaos, just like how any man operating with other people’s money without restraint or oversight, will become greedy/careless/crooked.

  53. failing for your mistake is a part of business. the market will always correct itself

  54. the market will not be allowed to correct itself in the states cullkull as it should in a free market system. There will be a bailout of monumental proportions just like jamaica with finsac. The risk takers on wall street want to privitize their profits but socialize their losses. That is not how capitalism should work.

  55. Breaking news….wayne smith has been back in Jamaica for almost two weeks and is on a spiritual high….(really not able to explain what that means).
    What is he saying:
    1..He is broke
    2..Olint is bankrupt
    3..David has made a number of mistakes.
    4…He will be taking out a full page ad to let people know the truth..

  56. CullKull:

    So do you think the 1 trillion $ bailout should take place or we should let the system fail totally and “Arise and Renew”?

    No one has said what the “cost” of failure is. They keep saying it would fair exceed the ! Trillion number. Smoke and Mirrors?

    I say let it fail! Pumping that much into a broken system will only lead to more misery; I can just see the wholesale liquidation of all the toxic properties…driving drown property values even more.

  57. RSI:

    Just saw your post and we agree on something!! 😀

  58. Isee Fraud:

    Why would he choose such a medium to explain the status of Olint? Why not post the info on his site or release an email? Also, will he be in Jamaica when such an Ad is release (is he still here…where)?

  59. Has the pressure of fraud broken someone? Is he only now willing to protect himself and his family from threats by exposing fraud? Has David thrown everyone to the wolves and going to run away with his family and what money is left? Guilt?Guilt?Guilt? Fraud?Fraud?Fraud? Repent?Repent?Repent?

  60. Or is David Smith going on a long vacation with the Martinezes’?

  61. Ad in the paper admitting failure…ok we will see…why why is he telling people that payment is coming next year lol !

  62. Being on a “spiritual high” wayne smith may be having guilt feelings now that he knows the magnitude of fraud that was perpetrated on the jamaican people and others arround the world.BTW the man who taught david smith the fraud game was arrested a couple of weeks ago in cayman..full story will be out in awhile

  63. Dave sin:

    finally we agree on something!

  64. Jamaican national targeted in Cayman fraud investigation had been accused before

    Published on Tuesday, September 16, 2008 Email To Friend Print Version

    By Tricia N. Henry
    Caribbean Net News Staff Reporter
    Email: tricia@caribbeannetnews.com

    GEORGE TOWN, Cayman Islands: Financial newsletter Offshore Alert has reported that Jamaican trader, Christopher Girvan, who is under investigation in the Cayman Islands on suspicion of defrauding hedge fund investors out of many millions of dollars, was accused of another fraud four years ago.

    Girvan was named as one of eight defendants in a civil complaint that was filed in US District Court in Virginia in 2004.

    Offshore Alert reported that Girvan was accused of participating in “a pattern of fraudulent and criminal schemes” involving several Cayman Islands entities.

    It was also alleged that the defendants were assisted in their scheme by a prominent attorney in the Cayman Islands, who, although not a party to the action, was named frequently in the complaint.

    “Defendants’ schemes have included numerous individual predicate acts of theft, breach of fiduciary duties, breach of contract, breach of trust, knowing and willful patent infringement, extortion, mail fraud, wire fraud, securities fraud, bankruptcy fraud, and violations of statutory requirements,” the complaint stated.

    The complaint also stated that the defendants’ acts caused “tens of millions of dollars in damages suffered by the plaintiffs, and have injured numerous innocent third parties in multiple countries around the world over a period of more than three years”.

    According to Offshore Alert, court records showed failed attempts made by the plaintiffs to serve Girvan at an address in Kingston, Jamaica.

    “There is no indication that service was effected and the case against Girvan never proceeded,” Offshore Alert said.

    Girvan was arrested by the Royal Cayman Islands Police in July 2008 on suspicion of theft, false accounting and fraud concerning the operation of a hedge fund group that comprised Grand Island Commodity Trading Fund I, Grand Island Commodity Trading Fund II, Grand Island Income Fund and Grand Island Master Fund.

    According to Offshore Alert, the group went into voluntary liquidation on June 17, 2008, with alleged losses of several millions of dollars.

  65. I heard about that along time ago…they even had a cayman blog about it…I knew it was too much of a damn coincidence…what about JI and his “hedge fund” in the cayman or some fraud like that….what about PB the “facilitator”. I guess them too well connected.

  66. This story about Girvan just shows that fraudsters never give up their trade. First Jamaica then the US then Cayman. I can hardly believe that we are seeing his name pop up again. But then again, the fraudsters thrive because many of their victims never give up the beliefs that make them such attractive victims.

  67. Well, I believe what is reportedly being said by WS is true, although not so sure about him being completely broke.
    Will those faithfull disciples now turn on him as a liar and an enemy of DS?
    And if what he said about Olint is true, when do we expect to hear from the ‘big man’ himself?
    In fact, whether it is true or false, DS has to say something soon, lawyers or not. He either has to refute or confess.

  68. Sirach, where are you my good man?

    Seems like the ‘full hundred’ is slowly coming out…..AND NOT BY YOU!!!

  69. wayne smith is going to jail, sooner rather than later.
    Only olint judgement creditors will grt money if they can find where david has hidden it. A stripper was raped at DSs house in turks by MM. DS owes a casino 6 hundred thousand dollars.

  70. The notion that Wayne Smith could REALLY take out a full page ad in the paper to tell people that olint is broke is ridiculous and will never happen. SURELY people on either side of the fence can’t really expect him or anybody else to do that.

    The ONLY meaningful info (in my humble opinion) that will be coming out in the future will be from the authorities doing their respective investigations.

    And at this point that is simlpy for closure

  71. the full hundred has been out.. From January ( or the last time you got paid)

    it just takes different times for people to realise it…

  72. But if Olint is really broke, isn’t it fraudulent for DS to orchestrate that charade about showing statement with US$750M supposedly on OANDA platform?

  73. Cally you are quick to say the full hundred coming out but not from sirach. You sure?

  74. WS can not be given credit for exposing fraud. He was an accomplice. Too late.

  75. What has Audley Shaw done since he was reportedly shown the “proof” from David Smith? Who go paid when, where and how?

  76. Many have started the real running tonight. But to where? Why? Unno really think you can run?

  77. Are you still going to going to give support money to DS right up until you go to jail?

  78. DS, TS, WS…hurry….what you see now is not yet the full extent….still early days. Stubborn ehhh….If you want it that way I suppose….you must know. Ego is a hell of a thing ehh.

  79. As you well know from chess DS we set the board first. When the Queen moves in then it’s game over. The Queen can be blocked….but to do so you may sacrifice a lesser piece. Other than that you must topple your King. It is up to you now. You will be allowed to be in charge only for a short time in which to make the decision.

  80. Do you want me to ask my Queen for mercy on your behalf? I am disappointed but not yet angry. That window may close at any time. It is up to you.

    9000 a month man……have you no reasoning to help the boss? What unno do now shall affect the rest of your lives. Do not waste time.

  81. Check WS for the number boss.

  82. Call anytime.

  83. The prophet is back from self-imposed exile. Were you up on the mount for 40 days and 40 nights, or were you in rehab? LOL

  84. A casualty of Cap Blu (and Olint Too). I hope it wasn’t “Church money” (taken from another blog).

    http://www.mthebrongroup.com/capitalblu/

  85. sirach I really think you are either an idiot or have nothing better to do with your time.

  86. Its seems like every day one of these high yielding alternative investment schemes goes down the tube with its clients funds.

    Read this latest report from CFTC.

    CFTC Sues Boca Raton Resident Michael A. Meisner and His Company, Phoenix Diversified Investment Corp., in Commodity Pool Anti-Fraud Action.
    http://www.cftc.gov/newsroom/enforcementpressreleases/2008/pr5556-08.html

    http://www.cftc.gov/stellent/groups/public/@lrenforcementactions/documents/legalpleading/enfmeisnercomplaint092308.pdf

  87. catd…I am probably an idiot. But your time is spent reading me….what does that make you? hahahahaaa

  88. Mr. Davis had my suspicions aroused in my initial meeting when he claimed he had 6 jets and he was 27 years old and only 4 principals. ENRON came to mind immediately. Unfortunately he was and is a fraud pretending to be Jamaican which has used as a rouse to solicit more funds via fraudulent claims for his operations and jet expenses. A pretty good actor who’s ego was one of his many downfalls. The U.S. economic crisis is partly to blame to fraudsters like him where the majority of funds he received was from institutions such as UBS beside his office.

  89. Does anyone know what’s going on with this case. Are they in jail?

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